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Why gamers hate NFTs, and music fans don’t – The Verge

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A tale of two fandoms
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Today, let’s talk about the very different reactions that two different types of fandoms are having to blockchain-based products — and whether that tells us anything about what average people might actually want out of crypto.
The fandoms are gaming and music. And while you’re always going out on a limb when you try to draw conclusions about such large, diverse groups, I can’t help but feel like I’m seeing a trend in the way they have responded so far to efforts from industry to sell them various blockchain-related things.
Start with the gamers. Outside those working on play-to-earn games like Axie Infinity, hostility toward crypto in the gaming community tends to be overwhelming. One of the most popular recurring stories over the past two months has been for a game developer to announce some sort of NFT integration in a forthcoming video game, inspiring a massive backlash, only to later disavow the project and apologize.

This week, it was Electronic Arts’ turn to reverse course. Three months ago, CEO Andrew Wilson said NFTs and blockchain gaming were “the future of our industry.” But on an earnings call Tuesday, Wilson said EA is not currently “driving hard on” crypto projects. Here’s Nick Statt at Protocol:
“I believe that collectability will continue to be an important part of our industry and the games and experiences that we offer our players. Whether that’s as part of the NFT blockchain, well, that remains to be seen. And I think the way we think about it is we want to deliver the best possible player experience we can. And so we’re going to evaluate that over time, but right now, it’s not something that we’re driving hard on,” Wilson said, in response to a question about any potential investments in NFTs or blockchain gaming.
Wilson’s comments came shortly after Team17, developers of the 75 million-copy-selling Worms franchise, abandoned plans for an NFT “MetaWorms” project. After fan outrage, it seemed to have no other choice. “We have listened to our Teamsters, development partners, and our games’ communities, and the concerns they’ve expressed, and have therefore taken the decision to step back from the NFT space,” the company said.
It can not be overstated the degree to which something like this happens every day. Consider these two memorable sentences from Cass Marshall in Polygon:
Valorant, the competitive shooter from Riot Games, stars a cast of near future heroes and mercenaries with unique skillsets and personalities. One of these characters, Killjoy, briefly ended up in hot water on social media after accidentally providing some acclaim to a NFT artist.
What happened? Well, the Valorant Twitter account posted a picture of Killjoy looking at a (real) work of art in a museum; it turned out that the artist behind the image sells his works as NFTs. In response, the Valorant team tweeted as if it were begging for its life. “We were not aware the selected work was an NFT,” the Valorant account said. “In no way did we intend to include NFTs as part of Killjoy’s work and hobbies.” The tweet earned 3,500 likes; Valorant was spared further harm.
Not even Troy Baker, one of the most beloved voice actors in gaming, could get away with an NFT project. He announced a partnership with something called VoiceVerse, whose “voice NFTs” would each include “a unique AI-generated voice map.” Perhaps anticipating criticism, Baker added: “You can hate. Or you can create. What’ll it be?” His fans chose hate, to the tune of 13,000 aggrieved quote tweets, and on Monday Baker quit the project.
Why are these projects so unpopular?
Reading through angry social media posts, a few key themes emerge. One, gamers and developers are engaged in a perennial battle over how games are monetized. Gamers generally want to pay one low price to play a game forever; developers are forever experimenting with exotic new financing schemes to grow their profits. Gamers have already been subjected to premium downloadable content; subscriptions, micro-transactions, and randomized loot boxes, each of which has been more poorly received than the last.
What these have in common is that they generally do not make games more fun to play; they do, however, make them more expensive. And so when Ubisoft says it will integrate NFTs into its shooter franchise Ghost Recon Breakpoint, and its players revolt, this is why. For the moment, it appears that the game’s NFTs will simply be collectible cosmetic items, like digital hats or jackets. But it’s easy to imagine Ubisoft eventually limiting access to parts of the game based on NFT ownership, at which point the whole thing has become one more micro-transaction to add to the pile.
This, in addition to all the usual crypto concerns — bad for the environment, full of scams, and so on — helps explain the gamer hatred of crypto. They see it as a force likely to warp the gaming industry into something less entertaining and less accessible. It’s now clear that gamers will resist that force wherever they see it.
That brings us to the world of music, where the response to crypto has been decidedly more muted. For example, consider the popular R&B singer John Legend. Legend has 21 million monthly Spotify listeners, 13.8 million Twitter followers, and a new NFT platform. (Disclaimer: John Legend is a Vox Media board member.)
Here’s Kim Bhasin at Bloomberg:
The 12-time Grammy Award winner is working with Chris Lin, who runs Taipei-based digital music service KKBOX, Twitch cofounder Kevin Lin and Matt Cheng of early-stage venture firm Cherubic Ventures as part owners of the new business.
The platform, called OurSong, allows artists to monetize their work through nonfungible tokens, which are digital certificates of authenticity that can be bought or sold. Legend will serve as chief impact officer to attract up-and-coming artists and their fans.
Legend hasn’t tweeted about the platform yet, but he did tweet about another NFT project, and the overall response was positive. Some people announced they were unfollowing him, but other people thought the NFTs were beautiful, and in any case Legend has not had to disavow all of crypto to remain in good standing with his fan base.
Or what about Coachella, perhaps the nation’s preeminent music festival for young people? Its parent company, AEG, announced it will auction off 10 lifetime passes on Friday morning as part of a larger move into NFTs. Some of the Coachella NFTs can be redeemed for physical items like posters and photo books. The digital goods come with analog benefits.
Coachella tweeted its announcement this week, and while some of the expected dunking materialized, it was far lighter than anything so far endured by game developers. Plenty of people seemed legitimately excited by the chance to bid on a lifetime pass. “The same people calling NFTs a scam in 2022, will be questioning how they missed out on a lifetime Coachella Ticket in 2022 via NFT mint,” one person responded. (Then again, someone else responded to that with a photo of a person pushing a button labeled “cringe.”)
What’s important is that the plan is moving forward. No angry mob materialized, and the auction will take place Friday as planned. I’m sure there are some people who might boycott Coachella over this, but the majority response seems to be somewhere in between indifference and enthusiasm. Not much to brag about, perhaps, but that’s a space that game developers would love to get to.
So what’s the difference between gaming NFTs and music NFTs? And what explains the different reactions?
One, live entertainment has always done a healthy business in collectibles; gaming hasn’t. Lots of people buy T-shirts when they go to a concert; it stands to reason that some of them would pay for a unique digital item as well. Many NFTs are sold with the implicit promise that they are investments; projects like Legend’s or Coachella’s, on the other hand, can represent themselves more honestly as souvenirs.
In practice, some gamers do buy souvenirs from the games they play. But not as many as buy concert T-shirts. And gamers’ souvenirs, whether posters or action figures, are separate from the game itself, and have no bearing on how fun the game is to play. That seems important.
Two, music NFTs can more easily be positioned as helping artists. When I decided to write last year about the startup Royal, which lets musicians sell their albums as NFTs, this was a large part of its appeal to me. Record labels are notorious for swallowing the lion’s share of an artist’s profits; what if artists could earn more by selling directly to fans? You may not want to buy an NFT from Legend or one of the artists he worked with on his project — but are you really going to begrudge him a chance to sell something directly to his fans?
(It’s telling that the NFT project that music fans arguably hate the most viscerally, Hit Piece, is a straight-up ripoff of artists: a project designed to sell NFTs of their songs without the permission of anyone involved.)
Meanwhile, game developers are generally large, profitable corporations whose relationship with their fans is fraught as best. (The dialogue between them frequently resembles a hostage negotiation, as you see in the Valorant story above.) In any case, no one selling gaming NFTs is even pretending that the move is for the benefit of artists, and that costs them significant goodwill.
Three, the music NFT projects I’m describing this week are entirely optional. You can still stream Legend on Spotify without buying one of his NFTs; you can still go to Coachella without winning an auction for a lifetime pass. The music industry has so far approached crypto as a way to sell extras to an artist’s most hardcore fans, and it’s natural that those hardcore fans have not rioted in response. They like the artist; they like the festival. If some people want to blow a lot more money on it, what’s the big deal?
Compare that to the gamer, who faces the prospect of having to compete in a shooter game against people who have paid to look superior to them, or have different levels of access or other perks thanks to crypto. There, the NFTs cannot be ignored — they’re warping the whole experience for everyone.
To some extent this already happens in a game like Fortnite, where players can pay for skins and other cosmetic items. But Fortnite is free to play, and many of those items can be earned for free through gameplay; the same cannot be said for most of the NFT plans that game developers have announced so far.
Why does any of this matter?
One of the refrains in “The Problem with NFTs,” Dan Olson’s epic video on the subject that I wrote about last week, is that most crypto projects exist only to get you to buy crypto. NFTs, DAOs, “play-to-earn” games — the whole point is to get you to stock up on Ethereum or some other cryptocurrency, which will raise the value of that currency and eventually allow its current holders to cash out at a profit.
Related
Looking at music NFTs, I see flashes of something that goes beyond a scheme to get the world to buy crypto. Festival passes, digital art, pressure on record labels — there’s a hint of something practical there. And it seems telling that, in the court of public opinion at least, it’s those nascent projects that seem to be getting a pass.
The world that enthusiasts call “web3” is still a mess, for all of the reasons I wrote about last week and more. But there is wisdom in fandoms, and they’re already telling us what they want from the blockchain — and what they don’t. I wonder what useful or entertaining new things startups could build once they start listening.
Platformer by Casey Newton

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4 Steps to Take Before Buying Your First NFT – The Motley Fool

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Read this before dipping your toes into the NFT waters.
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At the start of 2021, most people hadn’t heard of the word non-fungible token (NFT) and fewer still had any idea of what it meant. By the end of the year, Collins Dictionary had declared NFT its word of the year, and the market was worth an estimated $40 billion.
If you’re considering buying your first NFT, there’s a lot to think about. Here are four important steps to take first.
NFTs are essentially digital certificates of ownership, and those certificates can apply to a broad range of things. These include art, music, videos, sports collectibles, gaming items, and much more. You need to be clear on what type of NFT you’ll buy, and why you’re buying it.

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If you’re buying an NFT because everybody’s talking about them, you may need to dig a little deeper. Otherwise it’s a bit like buying a book because you want to own a book, with no care as to who wrote it or what’s inside it. Choosing an NFT should depend on your own personal interests, and there are big differences between NFT sectors.
For example, perhaps you’re a gamer and want to buy an NFT avatar. You’ll have very different needs from a big basketball fan who wants to own an NFT of a favorite sporting moment. And someone who’s an art collector considering branching into digital art will also have different requirements again.
Every investment is different, but the fundamentals of investing are often the same. You need to understand what you’re buying — whether it’s a piece of art, shares in a company, cryptocurrency, or your first NFT.

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We’ve found one company that’s positioned itself perfectly as a long-term picks-and-shovels solution for the broader crypto market — Bitcoin, Dogecoin, and all the others. In fact, you’ve probably used this company’s technology in the past few days, even if you’ve never had an account or even heard of the company before. That’s how prevalent it’s become.

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We’ve found one company that’s positioned itself perfectly as a long-term picks-and-shovels solution for the broader crypto market — Bitcoin, Dogecoin, and all the others. In fact, you’ve probably used this company’s technology in the past few days, even if you’ve never had an account or even heard of the company before. That’s how prevalent it’s become.
Sign up today for Stock Advisor and get access to our exclusive report where you can get the full scoop on this company and its upside as a long-term investment. Learn more and get started today with a special new member discount.
Here are some aspects of NFTs to get to grips with:
You’ll probably come across several NFT marketplaces during your research. These are platforms where you can create, buy, sell, and explore NFTs. First and foremost, look for a platform that trades the types of NFTs you want to buy.
Also consider what blockchain network is used — as we mentioned above, Ethereum is the most common but Solana (SOL) and Tezos (XTZ) are also getting in on the NFT game. This is important because it’s difficult to buy NFTs using traditional money such as U.S. dollars. Not only do you need to own cryptocurrency, you need to own the right cryptocurrency.
Given the prevalence of NFT fraud, look at what each platform does to ensure the NFT you buy is properly authenticated. You don’t want to buy your first NFT only to find it’s not legit and the original artist didn’t even know it had been made.
Finally, you’ll need an NFT wallet. These are crypto wallets that also support NFTs. It’s easy to set up a wallet, and there’s plenty of useful information online to help if you get stuck. When you first create your account, you’ll be given a kind of master password in the form of something called a seed phrase. Keep it somewhere safe, as this will help you access your NFTs if you ever forget your password.
You’ll need a wallet that’s compatible with the trading platform and blockchain network you chose above. Another key feature to watch out for is security — two factor authentication is a must. If you become a frequent NFT shopper, you might consider a hardware wallet that keeps your NFTs offline. But to start, a software wallet connected to the internet will do the job.
We don’t know how the NFT sector will evolve, but these assets could change the way we own items online. However, there are a lot of issues to address, including the environmental cost and copyright infringements. Right now, the best way to approach NFTs is to pursue your existing interests. This will help you judge the quality and value of the items you buy.
Be aware that there’s a lot of speculation, hype, and outright scams in the NFT world. There are no guarantees that NFT prices will continue to rise, in fact, many may fall. That’s why it’s best to only spend money you can afford to lose. If prices fall, it won’t prove financially devastating. Most of all, take your time and enjoy learning about a new world of digital ownership.
Emma owns the English-language newspaper The Bogota Post. She began her editorial career at a financial website in the U.K. over 20 years ago and has been contributing to The Ascent since 2019.
We’re firm believers in the Golden Rule, which is why editorial opinions are ours alone and have not been previously reviewed, approved, or endorsed by included advertisers. The Ascent does not cover all offers on the market. Editorial content from The Ascent is separate from The Motley Fool editorial content and is created by a different analyst team.
Emma Newbery owns Ethereum, Solana, and Tezos. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Bitcoin.
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How to Determine the Value of an NFT Before Investing – MUO – MakeUseOf

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When it comes to NFTs, there are a few ways to figure out if you should invest or not.
Like in the stock, forex, and crypto markets, where there are yardsticks to evaluate the strength of assets, there are metrics you can use to rate the worth and potential value of an NFT before investing in it. Four of these metrics will be explained in this article, along with some benefits and risks you should be aware of before investing in an NFT.
NFTs can be pretty valuable in a couple of ways. Apart from being investment instruments with high-profit potential, they are also used to establish identity, community, and ownership. Some people buy NFTs to support artists, and often, the artists earn more from this since they profit directly from their works without any intermediary.
As a new form of collectible, they are digital upgrades to items like comic books, arts, posters, sports cards, etc., attracting many to buy NFTs not because of any monetary gain they expect from them but because of the other values they have. Sometimes the value could be in the form of exclusive access to events, for gaming purposes, and some just buy it for the novelty of it.
For investors, NFTs have also become a profit-making technology (even though only a few people have become rich by getting involved in NFTs!).
One question you might then ask is how to spot which NFTs have the potential to offer you financial value and the ones to skip for investment purposes.
Below are four factors you should consider when trying to invest in an NFT.
NFT rarity will determine its value. For example, a rare NFT can be a first-of-its-kind piece of digital art by an illustrator; some NFTs made by celebrities also fall into the category of a rare NFT.
An example of an NFT that falls into this category is a project by Mike Winkelmann (aka Beeple) named "Everydays: The First 5000 Days." It's been called an "accumulative piece" because it's made up of 5,000 images, one for each day since May 2007, a total of 13 years. Speaking to Artnet, Metakovan and Twobadour, NFT collectors from Singapore, said they bought the piece because they believe it "is going to be a billion-dollar piece someday."
This covers how an NFT is used in the physical or digital world. In addition to being unique digital assets, certain non-fungible tokens also serve other purposes. Some NFTs, for example, give the owner rights and benefits they otherwise wouldn't have.
The Bored Ape Yacht Club started as a set of NFT images, but now they are tickets to special events and give rewards to their owners, such as the ability to print new NFTs. Many NFTs are also used in games, and they are valued differently based on the functions they play.
The ease with which an NFT can be bought or sold within its network refers to its liquidity. Investors like to invest in liquid NFTs (those with significant trading volumes) since the risk of holding them is reduced. ERC-standard NFTs are instantly tradable across a wide variety of exchanges. The ease of trade adds to the value of such NFTs.
The people and projects behind an NFT can stir up speculation, which can affect the growth and price of the NFT. In addition to who the creator is, the caliber of the people who have owned a certain NFT also affects its value. For example, NFTs owned by people of high social standing or celebrities usually have a high value. This way, we can also say that an NFT's price can be increased by affiliating it with a strong brand or famous figure.
If you choose to invest in NFTs, you should also be aware of some of the benefits of investing in them.
There are endless possibilities in the NFT space as they can be used for almost any project. Moreover, the use cases are also increasing steadily, making the future of NFT promising.
Another reason NFT investment might be a good idea is that they are accessible to everyone; it is not for any selected group of people. It is also easily transferable from one person or place to another. With this, there is an expectation that the technology will continue to grow more popular.
Investing in NFTs offers another way to diversify your portfolio, thereby reducing your overall risk. Even within the NFT space, there are different categories of assets you can invest in. Just make sure you do your research well before settling for any asset.
Ownership of NFT is secured through blockchain technology. This feature also helps to fractionalize ownership of assets. It is easier to divide ownership among several owners while everyone has a secured irreplicable record of their shares. Blockchain makes all records and transactions transparent, making trades more straightforward with less chance of fraudulence.
Since all NFT transactions are recorded in a blockchain, the data cannot be changed or tampered with, making NFTs easier to authenticate than physical assets. If you are buying a piece of art from an online store, you might not be able to know if you are getting the original or a copy. However, when buying an NFT, you can check the blockchain to validate the authenticity of the piece of art before paying for it.
Investing in NFTs is also not without certain risks. These concerns are issues that may hinder the growth of NFTs in the future.
Most NFTs are supported by the Ethereum network, which uses the proof of work (PoW) consensus method (although Ethereum is set to switch to proof of stake). The PoW consensus process takes a lot of energy to record and confirm transactions. To mint a single NFT, heaps of electricity is needed. Concerns have been raised that this could negatively affect the environment.
NFTs are very volatile, and the prices change rapidly, making it a little challenging to predict the future value of an NFT. You can lose your money if the NFT you buy doesn't retain its value.
NFT tech is still in its infant state and isn't very liquid. Many people still don't know what NFTs are, which makes it hard to trade because there aren't as many buyers and sellers. Furthermore, as you'll read below, their association with fraudulent activities harms their image.
NFTs can also be used to carry out fraudulent activities. There is no doubt that the integrity of blockchain is unquestionable. However, there have been cases of the sale of properties as NFTs without the consent of the real owners, violating the essence of using NFTs to sell properties. Several other NFT scams have been done, and this makes it necessary to be careful when trying to buy an NFT.
It cannot be overemphasized that, as much as there are advantages to investing in an NFT, there are also risks to it. You should not just invest in an NFT because it is an NFT. Rather, you should assess it to see if it has the potential to be more valuable in the future.
We understand that the NFT world is rapidly growing, and many things are bound to change. In this light, you should open your mind up to the possibilities while also being careful in the NFT space.
Temitope holds a B.A. and M.A. in linguistics. He started trading forex five years ago, and not long after that, he picked up interest in the crypto and blockchain systems. He has been a writer since 2019, and his experience in the Fintech industry has inspired most of his articles. When Temitope is not writing, he takes his time to learn new things and also loves to visit new places.
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Asia’s largest Web3 event Token2049 exclusively unveils NFT assets valued over $100 million – Cointelegraph

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Token2049, Asia’s premier crypto conference, announced that it will be showcasing a first-of-its-kind, immersive NFT experience, titled the Op3n Whale NFT Exhibition, at its upcoming Singapore edition from Sept. 28 to 29. The exhibition will be presenting NFT assets with a market value exceeding $100 million. This will be the first time such a collection owned by a single entity has ever been on display to the public. 
The exhibition was developed by Op3n, a launchpad for IP and communities in Web3, and Whale, the omniversal membership club with a treasury that includes the world’s largest collection of rare, high-value NFTs spanning gaming, art and virtual real estate.
Raphael Strauch, founder of Token2049, said: “Today’s Web3 ecosystem reflects the exciting creativity and innovation being brought by a myriad of industries by way of their growing interest in NFTs — and so much of this is taking place in Asia. We have an exciting program for our attendees, and this exhibition is just one part.”
Showcasing creatives, brands and curators from the region that exemplify the global dynamic of East meets West, the exhibition will make its exclusive debut at Asia’s largest Web3 event and Token2049’s largest-ever conference in its history. An estimated 7,000 visitors are expected to attend.
The exhibition includes artworks by renowned digital artist Pak, famed for spearheading Sotheby’s first-ever NFT sale; leading glitch artist Xcopy; Milanese artist duo Hackatao; and award-winning Asian-American photographer Michael Yamashita.
Token2049 Singapore will also feature a rotating display of generative art masterpieces from MoMa’s permanent collection artist Brendan Dawes and Instagram photography sensation Ryosuke Kosuge. These works will be displayed at Whale’s solo booth at the conference. 
Renowned NFT collector and Whale founder WhaleShark said: “Nonfungible technology has ignited a global digital renaissance of art and culture, and the ability to partner with Token2049 and Op3n to showcase some of the earliest and most renowned pioneers of this sector is truly an honor. The exhibition puts the spotlight on this inevitable revolution of the arts with a focus on a time-tested creative industry, rather than the flavor of the month.”
In addition, attendees will be able to see Op3n’s latest NFT drop “A3,” developed by YOON and VERBAL who are behind the iconic Tokyo-based fashion brand Ambush. The iconic phygital “A3” NFT will be uniquely presented in a glass display case on the exhibition floor. 
“Art, culture and technology are intersecting in exciting and completely new ways, with many industry-firsts taking place around the globe,” said Jaeson Ma, co-CEO and founder of Op3n, the world’s preeminent contemporary NFT experience brand. “From digital creators and traditional artists to fashion brands such as Ambush who have been expanding their presence in the NFT space, we’re bringing together an incredible pool of talent to celebrate and honor their work.”
Ma will also be speaking for a panel on the future of IP and communities in Web3 on Sept. 29 at 2:45 pm along with Verbal, who will speak more about “A3” in detail.
Token2049 Singapore’s agenda will be featuring a series of discussions touching on the latest developments in the Web3 ecosystem — from the global macro narrative for crypto, the rise of Web3 gaming, the emerging social and creator economy, the future of AI and generative art, present and future Web3 infrastructure and much more. 
As part of Asia Crypto Week, Token2049 attendees can expect to attend a full line-up of side events, conferences, networking events, workshops and parties taking place throughout the week. 
Visit the site for more information and continued updates on Token2049 Singapore. 
Token2049 is a premier Web3 event, organized annually in Singapore and London, where decision-makers in the global crypto ecosystem connect to exchange ideas, network and shape the industry. Token2049 is a global meeting place for entrepreneurs, institutions, industry insiders, investors and those with a strong interest in the crypto and blockchain industry.
Founded in 2021 as a subsidiary of EST Media Holdings, Op3n imagines a world where communities can come together to create, own and bring their ideas to the world. Op3n’s mission is to be a launchpad for ideas and communities to create meaningful experiences together. By consolidating the tools needed to mint, share and engage with NFTs and digital tokens into one vertical stack, Op3n leverages its cross-industry expertise from the entertainment, gaming and tech ecosystems to lay the foundations for a new era of community-driven, inclusive entertainment while bringing everyone together on a journey into Web3. 
Media Contact 
Melissa Esguerra

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