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Shopify is betting on NFTs to unlock a new take on shopping – Protocol

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Shopify is letting merchants use NFTs for their customers to unlock special products, perks and experiences.
The idea is that NFTs are a kind of loyalty card that a brand’s top fans can use to access exclusive items.
Despite the crypto crash, Shopify is betting that NFTs will change the way people shop online and in person. The ecommerce giant has a new service to enable customers to use NFTs to unlock special perks, products and real-world experiences with merchants.
Last year Shopify added the ability for merchants to sell NFTs using Shopify so customers don’t have to go to another site to buy them. With this new product, Shopify is taking that a step further through what’s known as “token-gated commerce.” The NFTs can come from anywhere the merchants want.
The idea is that NFTs are a kind of loyalty card — in the form of a cryptographic key — that a brand’s top fans can use to access exclusive items.
The current crash in the crypto markets has hit NFTs as well. But Alex Danco, head of blockchain at Shopify, says he is excited about the current market because it removes distraction and is good for focusing on actual ways NFTs can be used to help merchants and decreases the interest in pure speculation.

As a result, merchants aren’t shying away from NFTs, Danco said. “If anything, it’s the opposite, right? The fact that this is very clearly not about ‘double your money in the next week or whatever by NFTs.’ The fact that it’s not that anymore is actually a great sign for real businesses and real brands.”
Some retailers are dubious, but Danco believes crypto wallets and NFTs will be a big benefit for merchants, once he persuades them to “wander into something that is so drowned out by noise of all of the speculative mania.”
The biggest benefit of crypto and NFTs is crypto wallets, he said. “Everybody sort of jokes about ‘This is a big bubble and it left behind no infrastructure.’ It left one very, very important piece of infrastructure: Everybody has a wallet now.”
The NFT can also be used in person. Shopify tried out the product with Doodles, a popular NFT project, at this year’s South by Southwest. Doodles NFT holders could buy exclusive merchandise or access a Doodles experience at the show. At the NFT.NYC conference this week, NFT project Cool Cats is using Shopify to offer access to special products for token holders.
One other use of NFTs is collaborations between brands, especially between Web3 and non-Web3 companies, Danco said. Superplastic, a toy company, partnered with Bored Ape Yacht Club to create toys for ape holders. Gucci also recently collaborated with Superplastic.
Danco sees this as akin to an old, famous band and a new, popular band playing a show together and sharing fans. NFTs enable that kind of experience, he argues. ”The funny thing is, it’s very hard to authentically do these kinds of exclusive collabs online where people invite each other in. But what people are seeing as token gating is actually just perfect for this.”
He believes companies will move beyond simply using an NFT to buy a product, but that is the easiest way for companies to get started. Danco also sees app developers that build on Shopify adding many more uses for NFTs. “I have an inside view of what some of these app developers are doing in the pipeline, and it’s gonna be nuts,” he said.

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Tomio Geron ( @tomiogeron) is a San Francisco-based reporter covering fintech. He was previously a reporter and editor at The Wall Street Journal, covering venture capital and startups. Before that, he worked as a staff writer at Forbes, covering social media and venture capital, and also edited the Midas List of top tech investors. He has also worked at newspapers covering crime, courts, health and other topics. He can be reached at tgeron@protocol.com or tgeron@protonmail.com.
Sealed offers homeowners the chance to save money and help protect the planet.
Sealed is convincing homeowners to look at their HVAC systems and insulation in order to save energy and money.
Lisa Martine Jenkins is a senior reporter at Protocol covering climate. Lisa previously wrote for Morning Consult, Chemical Watch and the Associated Press. Lisa is currently based in Brooklyn, and is originally from the Bay Area. Find her on Twitter ( @l_m_j_) or reach out via email (ljenkins@protocol.com).
Shiny silver panels hug the walls of Andy Frank’s attic; they vaguely remind me of a child’s robot Halloween costume. A sticky-looking foam lines both the gaps in the attic’s floorboards and the roof, plugging up holes where squirrels could have once taken shelter.
The space is positively sweat-inducing, even for the mere minute I have my head poking above the trapdoor.
I duck my head out and let the door close, so that I’m fully back on the second floor of the Connecticut home. The sweaty June feeling evaporates instantly on the pleasant — even cool! — landing. Frank assures me this was not always the case: Hot summers and cold winters used to be a fact of life in certain rooms, even with his HVAC system running at maximum power. This is his home post-Sealed.
Frank is the president and co-founder of the home decarbonization company, which he launched in 2012 alongside CEO and co-founder Lauren Salz. While Sealed is a decade old, it has found its footing in recent years. The pandemic, in particular, gave rise to a set of circumstances that Sealed was inadvertently positioned to address. As Salz put it, the pandemic “just brought forward the future in a lot of different ways.”

When it comes to home electrification, that future can’t come soon enough. Residential energy use accounts for roughly 20% of the greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. There are about 80 million owner-occupied homes in the U.S., most of which have not been weatherized. That means they leak heat in the winter and cold air in the summer. Stopping this waste at the source has the potential to be a huge opportunity for decarbonization and making people’s lives more comfortable. It’s also daunting; no two homes are alike, creating a near-infinite suite of solutions.
White spray foam is seen between home joists and a concrete wall in a basement. Spray foam lines the home’s joists in Andy Frank’s basement.Photo: Lisa Martine Jenkins/Protocol
But Sealed is doing the improbable: convincing homeowners to take a long, hard look at their oft-ignored HVAC systems and insulation in order to save both energy and money.
The company’s central premise is that it will cut a home’s energy bill through a combination of installing insulation, a heat pump and other upgrades like air sealing (the sticky-looking foam in Frank’s attic, for example) and LED bulbs. If those upgrades fail to save energy, Sealed will eat the cost of retrofits. Assuming they do, the price of the upgrades are amortized over time, a setup that Sealed customer Michael Latchmansingh said is “fantastic.”
After purchasing his Eastchester, New York, home in 2019, Latchmansingh and his family endured a chilly winter that made it clear his upstairs rooms weren’t sufficiently insulated. At the recommendation of his dad, he reached out to Sealed about an upgrade.
The Sealed process, crucially, starts with an analysis of a home’s energy use, both current and future. It combines information like a home’s age, location, layout and energy usage history with data from third-party sources like Zillow and Google Maps to present its customers with personalized proposals on how to save energy.

These first steps are all done remotely; then, the company partners with local installers that have been vetted and trained in energy efficiency to come do the physical work. Sealed currently operates in the Northeast, which is an ideal location for its services given the warm-to-hot summers and cold winters. But it has expanded to Chicago — another place with extreme seasons — thanks to a recent $29.5 million funding round.
“We need to make sure that the installation happens in a quality way, because the truth of the matter is, in most cases, the quality of the installation actually matters more than the equipment itself,” said Frank, noting that the market for home efficiency-specific contractors is growing from a relatively small base.
Some customers (like Latchmansingh) elect to upgrade just their insulation or invest in air sealing, whereas others elect to go whole-hog and overhaul everything. Frank’s first home, purchased in 2020’s pandemic rush, serves as a laboratory of sorts for the Sealed process.
Sealed co-founder Andy Frank standing in his basement next to a heat pump hot water heater. There are marks where the boiler once stood in the basement, next to the new heat pump hot water heater. Photo: Lisa Martine Jenkins/Protocol
For Frank, the upgrades couldn’t come soon enough. After a winter in which he and his wife went to sleep wrapped in sweaters and avoided their primary bathroom — it sits over a drafty garage, which made it tundra-like — Frank installed eight heat pumps across his home’s three levels. One of these heat pumps whispers contentedly behind his desk, right above a framed vintage heat pump advertisement. (Yes, he really likes heat pumps that much.)
The house is now reliably comfortable in the sticky New England summer. (How it handles the winter remains to be seen, since the upgrades are fairly recent.) Signs of the old HVAC system can be found throughout the home: There are marks where the boiler once stood in the basement and on certain walls where ducts have been removed. The mammoth air conditioner that once cooled Frank’s house now sits in the garage, waiting to be carted away. The kitchen still has a gas range for cooking, though an induction stove is on the way, meaning Frank will be able to cap his gas main in short order.

It’s homes like Frank’s that form a major part of the electrification challenge: older, with heating systems that rely on fossil fuels. Most homeowners don’t think about their HVAC systems until they need to be replaced, which happens roughly once a decade. It’s a timeline that is slower than addressing climate change demands, said Panama Bartholomy, executive director of the Building Decarbonization Coalition.
“Existing buildings are the real challenge” when it comes to moving away from the use of methane gas in the home, Bartholomy said. While there has been a surge of cities banning gas hookups, those bans have only focused on new buildings.
“We need to be putting in place structures in order to be able to really get contractors and building owners to start making these transitions,” Bartholomy added.
Even if more legislation that favors electrified appliances over gas ones and promotes weatherization is a ways off, the fact that companies like Sealed are finding success is a sign of at least some progress. Heat pumps in particular have proven to be a sleeper hit, with sales hitting an all-time high in the last two years, per the Building Decarbonization Coalition’s manufacturing members, Bartholomy said.
This is a trend that both Bartholomy and Salz attribute to the pandemic. As people spend most of their time in their homes, investing in comfort has become a priority. That means not just a more nappable couch, but also heating, cooling and general home efficiency. Interest has also coincided with rising concerns about how piping methane gas into homes can worsen indoor air quality and also be a public safety concern, given the risk of explosions.
A vintage ad for a GE heat pump. There's a drawing of a woman sitting on the parquet floor. The vintage ad that Frank has hanging in his office.Image: GE
“The only way to really drive mass adoption of these types of technologies is … a really strong customer value proposition that isn’t about either saving money or saving the planet,” Salz said, because regardless of the potential benefits, “it’s still a home renovation.”

For Latchmansingh, it’s one he would go through again. The first installation of insulation took a few days (though the contractors did have to pause for a day when the heat in the attic at the height of summer became unbearable) and generally speaking was “as easy as could be.”
Latchmansingh said he would return to Sealed when the time comes to replace his HVAC system. In retrospect, he wishes he had done so last summer, before the war in Ukraine sent gas prices through the roof. And in the meantime, he is spreading the Sealed gospel to friends and family who might qualify.
That “seeing is believing” evangelism and education are core parts of Sealed’s vision. The team is putting new emphasis on teaching customers about the merits of decarbonization and the technologies available to do so. The good news, Frank said, is that heat pumps can address many issues people have with their home, from comfort to sustainability to health. The bad? The majority of people don’t know they exist. But happy customers and more outreach could flip that script.
“Most of the people we encounter in the market don’t know a lot about heat pumps, but it’s better than it was a couple of years ago,” Frank said. “It’s really a matter of first educating them … and then making it easy and affordable for them to be able to install those technologies.”
Lisa Martine Jenkins is a senior reporter at Protocol covering climate. Lisa previously wrote for Morning Consult, Chemical Watch and the Associated Press. Lisa is currently based in Brooklyn, and is originally from the Bay Area. Find her on Twitter ( @l_m_j_) or reach out via email (ljenkins@protocol.com).
Nathan Coutinho leads Logitech’s global conferencing business strategy and analyst relations. A Swiss company focused on innovation and quality, Logitech designs products and experiences that have an everyday place in people’s lives.Coutinho leads strategy and execution of Logitech’s video conferencing solutions, from personal solutions to highly-scalable conference rooms.Coutinho has more than 25 years of experience in the IT industry with various roles in executive leadership, consulting, engineering, marketing and technical sales.
Now that most organizations are returning to the office, there are varying extremes – some leaders demand that employees return to the office, with some employees revolting and some rejoicing to be together again. On the other hand, some companies have closed physical offices and made remote work permanent; creating a sigh of relief for some employees and creating frustration for others.
Most of us are somewhere in between, trying our best to take a measured approach at building the right hybrid strategy tailored to company culture. Some seemingly have begun to crack the code, while the majority are grappling with the when, how, why, and who of this new hybrid work reality.
Hybrid work success looks different depending on who you ask. Your company is made up of a cast of players, each with a role critical to a competitive and thriving business, and with an eye on their North Star: employee happiness. How do you appease all those stakeholders so we can all just move on and do our jobs without getting bogged down with the mechanics of it all?

IT: The technology behind hybrid success
Let’s first consider IT, which is the team most bogged down in the mechanics of it all. Heroically having kept workforces running with ad hoc setups during the pandemic, this team is now focused on standardizing technology for the varied mix of remote and in-office employees.
However, employee expectations are completely different than they were pre-pandemic. Technology that was once a nice-to-have is now table stakes not only in conference rooms, but for any space — whether that’s a private office, hot desk, or remote desk.
As a result the IT team is now thinking holistically about how to outfit their hybrid workforces so that each employee has equal access to the highest-quality hardware, software, and solutions. The setups also have to play well in an ecosystem where employees routinely toggle between Zoom, Microsoft Teams, Google Meet, and a number of other web-based platforms for video meetings.
Facilities: Configuring “anywhere” spaces
Since the pandemic, facilities teams have redesigned, closed, shrunk, expanded, rebuilt, moved, and retrofitted offices to accommodate the dynamics of an evolving workforce. Whether they’re creating hot desks, huddle rooms, or traditional conference rooms, this team has the difficult task of space-planning for employees who may or may not even come into the physical office on any given day.
Rightsizing, where each meeting space is outfitted for a specific purpose, is top of mind for facilities pros. Reconfiguring rooms to support new hybrid work schedules enables personalization and a safe return to the office. Understanding how employees will use spaces as they come back, and enabling them to easily find and use these spaces will be critical for success.

Human Resources: It’s all about the employee experience
Keeping the Great Resignation at bay is just the start for this team. HR professionals are trying to build and retain a healthy, productive workforce, in all its facets and complications.
Having distributed locations, while sometimes seen as a tremendous benefit, can also bring drawbacks from the lack of face-to-face communication, onboarding, and mentoring. HR leaders are also keenly aware of the lack of equitable experiences some remote employees face when meeting with in-office colleagues.

While some of the HR team’s concerns about employee experiences can be solved with technology (like using easy, intuitive tech to connect teams), the HR team’s challenges stretch into areas that are hard to measure. Cultivating creativity and building unified cultures within hybrid work are massive undertakings with no one-size-fits-all solution.

Finance team: Investment decisions
Finance teams are looking at the not-so-insignificant impact of hybrid work costs. One of the challenges is hybrid work’s coordination problem, as highlighted by Microsoft in its 2022 Work Trends Index Report. Because most organizations have yet to take a data-driven approach to hybrid work, they are continuing to incur the cost of maintaining their campuses while also shelling out work-from-home stipends to a growing virtual workplace.
Thinking smart about hybrid
Our focus at Logitech is helping the industry solve many of these problems.
Making hybrid work successful for everyone requires much more than AI-based innovations. We’ve built solutions that help make the virtual meeting experience more equitable for all, provide analytics and insights into meeting room usage, while bringing simplicity with one touch.
But that’s just the beginning. Listening to all stakeholders — and seeing their challenges through the lens of their role — is the smartest possible start to make this hybrid work actually work. And we’re on it.
Learn more about how Logitech Video Collaboration is making hybrid work for global brands.
Nathan Coutinho leads Logitech’s global conferencing business strategy and analyst relations. A Swiss company focused on innovation and quality, Logitech designs products and experiences that have an everyday place in people’s lives.Coutinho leads strategy and execution of Logitech’s video conferencing solutions, from personal solutions to highly-scalable conference rooms.Coutinho has more than 25 years of experience in the IT industry with various roles in executive leadership, consulting, engineering, marketing and technical sales.
HR experts said companies need to be proactive about protections for contraception, privacy and LGBTQ+ rights.
Experts say tech leaders need to start thinking about future Supreme Court rulings.
Lizzy Lawrence ( @LizzyLaw_) is a reporter at Protocol, covering tools and productivity in the workplace. She’s a recent graduate of the University of Michigan, where she studied sociology and international studies. She served as editor in chief of The Michigan Daily, her school’s independent newspaper. She’s based in D.C., and can be reached at llawrence@protocol.com.
Sarah (Sarahroach_) writes for Source Code at Protocol. She’s a recent graduate of The George Washington University, where she studied journalism and criminal justice. She served for two years as editor-in-chief of GW’s independent newspaper, The GW Hatchet. Sarah is based in New York, and can be reached at sroach@protocol.com
Tech companies are still trying to prepare for a post-Roe world. But it might already be time to think about what the Supreme Court is planning next.
When the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade Friday, Justice Clarence Thomas wrote in a concurring opinion that the court should also reconsider rulings protecting contraception and same-sex relationships, citing Griswold, Lawrence and Obergefell. If those decisions were ever overruled, it would have massive implications for everyone, but especially for employees living in states where same-sex marriage is at risk of becoming illegal without a federal shield.
Dozens of tech companies have announced policies to protect workers seeking abortions over the past month, and many of the logistics of those plans are unclear or still being decided. But given that the Supreme Court’s decision on abortion might be followed by more rulings down the line, HR experts said companies need to be proactive about protections for contraception, privacy and LGBTQ+ rights.

“Anybody who’s thinking about what’s going on in this country generally has to think about this,” said Janet Stovall, global head of DEI at the NeuroLeadership Institute.
When the decision to overturn the Supreme Court ruling on abortion was first leaked last month, some companies responded immediately with benefits. Others stood on the sidelines.
Companies including Bumble, Microsoft and Tesla announced almost immediately that they would cover abortion-related travel costs, while others said they’d offer relocation assistance for those living in states where abortion is heavily restricted (dozens of tech companies are based in states where abortion could become illegal or restricted). Some tech leaders were more quiet at the time of the leaked ruling. Meta, for example, told workers not to discuss abortion on its internal messaging platform. PlayStation told workers to “respect differences of opinion.”
Now that the ruling is official, companies are much more outspoken. Meta and Apple joined the chorus of tech companies publicly announcing their abortion-related travel coverage, although the exact steps companies are taking to implement the policy without exposing employee data aren’t entirely clear. “We are in the process of assessing how best to do so given the legal complexities involved,” a Meta spokesperson told Protocol. Apple did not respond to a request for comment.
When it comes to future rulings, though, companies are once again choosing silence for now. Protocol asked 22 companies providing abortion-related travel coverage if they are preparing for a world in which same-sex marriage and same-sex relationships are not federally protected, given Thomas’ opinion. The companies that responded — including Indeed, Meta, Yelp, Match Group, Citigroup, DoorDash and Microsoft — reiterated their abortion coverage plans but did not say whether they are preparing for future Supreme Court rulings. DoorDash said it couldn’t speculate on future court decisions.
Yuvay Ferguson, a marketing professor at Howard University, said now is the time for companies to expand their actions beyond covering abortion-related travel. Ferguson said Justice Thomas’ opinion should serve as an alarm for everyone to act, including tech companies.
“Companies need to make sure they have a stance of supporting reproductive rights, not necessarily singularly focusing on abortion,” Ferguson said.

Contraception falls under that umbrella, but rights to same-sex relationships and marriage may come under fire as well. Tech companies will feel more pressure to go beyond rainbow-colored websites and declarations and stand up for LGBTQ+ folks internally and externally. Staying silent on bills like Florida’s “Don’t Say Gay” law may no longer fly.
“How are you supporting people internally who don’t have the same resources as the people at the top, writing these PR statements?” said Madison Butler, chief people officer at cannabis company Grav. “It all comes down to inward accountability.”
Stovall said companies should first take care of people internally and be sure to communicate the gravity of the situation. Next, look at the legal landscape and figure out the actions you could even take against a harmful law. Lastly, carefully consider if you want to take a stand on the issue externally because if you do, you have to follow through. You don’t want to be perceived as picking and choosing certain issues, Stovall said.
“Is what you’re saying deliberate?” Stovall said. “Is it educated, is it purposeful, is it tailored to who you are and is it habitual? You need to be sure that it’s something that you’re gonna support going forward.”
Butler said the first and most important action is to have honest conversations with your marginalized employees. In other words, the employees whose rights would be most impacted by the reversal of these rulings. What do they need in order to feel supported? Maybe it’s an immediate need, like relocation. Maybe they want more concrete anti-discrimination policies or active advocation against harmful legislation. Butler emphasized that this messaging should come from the top, not just from employee activists or ERGs.
“All of these conversations should live in the C-suite,” Butler said. “We should absolutely be expecting this work and emotional labor from the people who are taking home millions every year.”
Salaried tech workers are not the people who will struggle most to get an abortion or contraception. Ferguson said she hopes tech companies, with all their power and money, don’t forget about the hourly workers who are most harmed by the rollback of rights. Tech leaders may start to think about preemptively advocating against these decisions, or their role in protecting user data from being weaponized. Stovall said companies should think about their locations in states that especially limit rights. “How do we have equity when we operate in inequitable spaces?” she said.

In the immediate wake of the Roe reversal, and in potential future decisions to come, Butler recommended giving employees space to feel a complex bundle of emotions.
“This is not just some brushstroke news article,” Butler said. “It’s not an op-ed. This is people’s lives.”
Lizzy Lawrence ( @LizzyLaw_) is a reporter at Protocol, covering tools and productivity in the workplace. She’s a recent graduate of the University of Michigan, where she studied sociology and international studies. She served as editor in chief of The Michigan Daily, her school’s independent newspaper. She’s based in D.C., and can be reached at llawrence@protocol.com.
From employee support to privacy concerns, tech companies play a critical role in what’s to come for abortion access in the U.S.
States banning abortion means that tech will play a critical role in what’s to come for abortion access in the U.S.
Alex Eichenstein (@alexeichenstein) is Protocol’s social media editor. Previously, she managed social media and audience engagement efforts at the Center for Public Integrity. She earned an B.A. in English, women and gender studies and political science from the University of Delaware. She lives in Washington, D.C.
Nat Rubio-Licht is a Los Angeles-based news writer at Protocol. They graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in newspaper and online journalism in May 2020. Prior to joining the team, they worked at the Los Angeles Business Journal as a technology and aerospace reporter.
The end of Roe v. Wade has sent the world of tech scrambling. Many companies are now trying to quickly figure out how to protect workers in states where abortion will be banned, while also facing potential privacy and legal ramifications.

Here’s a look at tech companies’ roles and responses to the ruling. We will update this page as news and events change.
Alex Eichenstein (@alexeichenstein) is Protocol’s social media editor. Previously, she managed social media and audience engagement efforts at the Center for Public Integrity. She earned an B.A. in English, women and gender studies and political science from the University of Delaware. She lives in Washington, D.C.
Apple’s “buy now, pay later” product has a distinctly different distribution strategy that means it doesn’t directly threaten Affirm, Klarna and Afterpay.
Apple Pay Later emerges as a distinctly different product than what Klarna and Affirm offer.
Veronica Irwin (@vronirwin) is a San Francisco-based reporter at Protocol covering fintech. Previously she was at the San Francisco Examiner, covering tech from a hyper-local angle. Before that, her byline was featured in SF Weekly, The Nation, Techworker, Ms. Magazine and The Frisc.
Apple’s entry into the “buy now, pay later” market was one of its worst-kept secrets: Analysts had been predicting the company’s rollout of a pay-later service as early as 2020. The most common read on the move was predictable: Apple was here to smash the competition. The company has a track record of jumping into new sectors late and still managing to come out on top — the iPod came out when there were tons of MP3 players on the market.
But some analysts have a starkly different view. When you look at it under the hood, Apple Pay Later emerges as a distinctly different product than what Klarna and Affirm offer, they say — and one that isn’t much of a market predator.
“This is an opportunity to greatly expand ‘buy now, pay later’ services to people who haven’t used them in the past,” said Ian Rasmussen, who co-leads the North American asset-backed securities ratings group at Fitch Ratings.

That’s for two main reasons. For one, Apple is marketing its pay-later offering to customers in an entirely different place than competitors. Second, the customers Apple is targeting have habits that differ markedly from traditional “buy now, pay later” users.
The most popular pay-later providers have a straightforward primary marketing strategy: partner with retailers that typically feature their logos at checkout, prompting customers to pay over time. Many of these partnerships are exclusive, allowing a company like Klarna, for example, to be the only pay-later provider for customers checking out at Macy’s. The tight integration is meant to boost conversions. Reducing or eliminating “friction” is a “huge factor” in helping sign customers up, said Harry Kohl, a director at Fitch Ratings.
The pay-later companies are trying to extend their reach through financial super apps, which allow customers to apply for payment plans even when there’s not a deal in place with a retailer, though that takes more steps than pressing a button at checkout. Other tools are the virtual and physical cards that allow customers to pay online or in-store, like Affirm’s Debit+ card or the Klarna Card.
Apple Pay Later lives in Apple’s digital wallet, an iPhone feature the company has been trying to build up. Users will be prompted to check out using Apple Pay Later any time they use Apple Pay, or can configure loans directly in the wallet. Customers who do will be able to complete the payment across four charges, spread out over six weeks. The wallet will also show users their Apple Pay Later plans and the payments due over the next 30 days, Apple said.
Confusingly, Apple Pay Later is almost completely separate from Apple’s other venture into consumer credit, the Apple Card. (Apple Card has its own pay-over-time feature, but only for Apple products.) Customers must link payments to a debit card, not a credit card like the Apple Card.
Apple’s advantage is the wide reach of iPhones among consumers and Apple Pay among merchants — particularly at retail, where the pay-later companies are trying to use cards to boost usage.

“It’s a different mindset,” said Patrick DellaValle, director in the financial services practice at Guidehouse. Apple doesn’t need to compete with other pay-later companies for exclusive contracts with retailers, he said, and can focus on continuing to monetize loyal Apple consumers. “They could miss out [on some customers], but it could also be an intentional strategy if you’re going to focus on those customers that will pay upfront with Apple Pay,” he said.
Those existing Apple customers differ from the kind of customer “buy now, pay later” companies have talked about serving: typically a younger person, turned off by credit cards. Third-party surveys consistently show that Apple customers have higher incomes and spend more than Android users.
About three-quarters of pay-later users in the U.S. are Gen Z or millennials, according to a report from eMarketer. Adults who make between $50,000 and $100,000 are most likely to use “buy now, pay later.” Research from The Ascent also shows that 45% of those customers are using “buy now, pay later” to afford something that didn’t already fit into their budgets.
That all points to Apple not making Apple Pay Later to woo existing “buy now, pay later” customers away from the services they use. Instead, it appears the company made a product for the people who love Apple, aimed at persuading them to make more use of the Wallet app and Apple Pay.
Mike Taiano, a senior director at Fitch’s North American Banks Group, sees it simply. “This is another tentacle for them to get into customers’ everyday life,” he said. “I wouldn’t necessarily assume that they automatically go to the top of the leaderboard.”
Veronica Irwin (@vronirwin) is a San Francisco-based reporter at Protocol covering fintech. Previously she was at the San Francisco Examiner, covering tech from a hyper-local angle. Before that, her byline was featured in SF Weekly, The Nation, Techworker, Ms. Magazine and The Frisc.
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NFT

How to Determine the Value of an NFT Before Investing – MUO – MakeUseOf

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When it comes to NFTs, there are a few ways to figure out if you should invest or not.
Like in the stock, forex, and crypto markets, where there are yardsticks to evaluate the strength of assets, there are metrics you can use to rate the worth and potential value of an NFT before investing in it. Four of these metrics will be explained in this article, along with some benefits and risks you should be aware of before investing in an NFT.
NFTs can be pretty valuable in a couple of ways. Apart from being investment instruments with high-profit potential, they are also used to establish identity, community, and ownership. Some people buy NFTs to support artists, and often, the artists earn more from this since they profit directly from their works without any intermediary.
As a new form of collectible, they are digital upgrades to items like comic books, arts, posters, sports cards, etc., attracting many to buy NFTs not because of any monetary gain they expect from them but because of the other values they have. Sometimes the value could be in the form of exclusive access to events, for gaming purposes, and some just buy it for the novelty of it.
For investors, NFTs have also become a profit-making technology (even though only a few people have become rich by getting involved in NFTs!).
One question you might then ask is how to spot which NFTs have the potential to offer you financial value and the ones to skip for investment purposes.
Below are four factors you should consider when trying to invest in an NFT.
NFT rarity will determine its value. For example, a rare NFT can be a first-of-its-kind piece of digital art by an illustrator; some NFTs made by celebrities also fall into the category of a rare NFT.
An example of an NFT that falls into this category is a project by Mike Winkelmann (aka Beeple) named "Everydays: The First 5000 Days." It's been called an "accumulative piece" because it's made up of 5,000 images, one for each day since May 2007, a total of 13 years. Speaking to Artnet, Metakovan and Twobadour, NFT collectors from Singapore, said they bought the piece because they believe it "is going to be a billion-dollar piece someday."
This covers how an NFT is used in the physical or digital world. In addition to being unique digital assets, certain non-fungible tokens also serve other purposes. Some NFTs, for example, give the owner rights and benefits they otherwise wouldn't have.
The Bored Ape Yacht Club started as a set of NFT images, but now they are tickets to special events and give rewards to their owners, such as the ability to print new NFTs. Many NFTs are also used in games, and they are valued differently based on the functions they play.
The ease with which an NFT can be bought or sold within its network refers to its liquidity. Investors like to invest in liquid NFTs (those with significant trading volumes) since the risk of holding them is reduced. ERC-standard NFTs are instantly tradable across a wide variety of exchanges. The ease of trade adds to the value of such NFTs.
The people and projects behind an NFT can stir up speculation, which can affect the growth and price of the NFT. In addition to who the creator is, the caliber of the people who have owned a certain NFT also affects its value. For example, NFTs owned by people of high social standing or celebrities usually have a high value. This way, we can also say that an NFT's price can be increased by affiliating it with a strong brand or famous figure.
If you choose to invest in NFTs, you should also be aware of some of the benefits of investing in them.
There are endless possibilities in the NFT space as they can be used for almost any project. Moreover, the use cases are also increasing steadily, making the future of NFT promising.
Another reason NFT investment might be a good idea is that they are accessible to everyone; it is not for any selected group of people. It is also easily transferable from one person or place to another. With this, there is an expectation that the technology will continue to grow more popular.
Investing in NFTs offers another way to diversify your portfolio, thereby reducing your overall risk. Even within the NFT space, there are different categories of assets you can invest in. Just make sure you do your research well before settling for any asset.
Ownership of NFT is secured through blockchain technology. This feature also helps to fractionalize ownership of assets. It is easier to divide ownership among several owners while everyone has a secured irreplicable record of their shares. Blockchain makes all records and transactions transparent, making trades more straightforward with less chance of fraudulence.
Since all NFT transactions are recorded in a blockchain, the data cannot be changed or tampered with, making NFTs easier to authenticate than physical assets. If you are buying a piece of art from an online store, you might not be able to know if you are getting the original or a copy. However, when buying an NFT, you can check the blockchain to validate the authenticity of the piece of art before paying for it.
Investing in NFTs is also not without certain risks. These concerns are issues that may hinder the growth of NFTs in the future.
Most NFTs are supported by the Ethereum network, which uses the proof of work (PoW) consensus method (although Ethereum is set to switch to proof of stake). The PoW consensus process takes a lot of energy to record and confirm transactions. To mint a single NFT, heaps of electricity is needed. Concerns have been raised that this could negatively affect the environment.
NFTs are very volatile, and the prices change rapidly, making it a little challenging to predict the future value of an NFT. You can lose your money if the NFT you buy doesn't retain its value.
NFT tech is still in its infant state and isn't very liquid. Many people still don't know what NFTs are, which makes it hard to trade because there aren't as many buyers and sellers. Furthermore, as you'll read below, their association with fraudulent activities harms their image.
NFTs can also be used to carry out fraudulent activities. There is no doubt that the integrity of blockchain is unquestionable. However, there have been cases of the sale of properties as NFTs without the consent of the real owners, violating the essence of using NFTs to sell properties. Several other NFT scams have been done, and this makes it necessary to be careful when trying to buy an NFT.
It cannot be overemphasized that, as much as there are advantages to investing in an NFT, there are also risks to it. You should not just invest in an NFT because it is an NFT. Rather, you should assess it to see if it has the potential to be more valuable in the future.
We understand that the NFT world is rapidly growing, and many things are bound to change. In this light, you should open your mind up to the possibilities while also being careful in the NFT space.
Temitope holds a B.A. and M.A. in linguistics. He started trading forex five years ago, and not long after that, he picked up interest in the crypto and blockchain systems. He has been a writer since 2019, and his experience in the Fintech industry has inspired most of his articles. When Temitope is not writing, he takes his time to learn new things and also loves to visit new places.
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Asia’s largest Web3 event Token2049 exclusively unveils NFT assets valued over $100 million – Cointelegraph

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Token2049, Asia’s premier crypto conference, announced that it will be showcasing a first-of-its-kind, immersive NFT experience, titled the Op3n Whale NFT Exhibition, at its upcoming Singapore edition from Sept. 28 to 29. The exhibition will be presenting NFT assets with a market value exceeding $100 million. This will be the first time such a collection owned by a single entity has ever been on display to the public. 
The exhibition was developed by Op3n, a launchpad for IP and communities in Web3, and Whale, the omniversal membership club with a treasury that includes the world’s largest collection of rare, high-value NFTs spanning gaming, art and virtual real estate.
Raphael Strauch, founder of Token2049, said: “Today’s Web3 ecosystem reflects the exciting creativity and innovation being brought by a myriad of industries by way of their growing interest in NFTs — and so much of this is taking place in Asia. We have an exciting program for our attendees, and this exhibition is just one part.”
Showcasing creatives, brands and curators from the region that exemplify the global dynamic of East meets West, the exhibition will make its exclusive debut at Asia’s largest Web3 event and Token2049’s largest-ever conference in its history. An estimated 7,000 visitors are expected to attend.
The exhibition includes artworks by renowned digital artist Pak, famed for spearheading Sotheby’s first-ever NFT sale; leading glitch artist Xcopy; Milanese artist duo Hackatao; and award-winning Asian-American photographer Michael Yamashita.
Token2049 Singapore will also feature a rotating display of generative art masterpieces from MoMa’s permanent collection artist Brendan Dawes and Instagram photography sensation Ryosuke Kosuge. These works will be displayed at Whale’s solo booth at the conference. 
Renowned NFT collector and Whale founder WhaleShark said: “Nonfungible technology has ignited a global digital renaissance of art and culture, and the ability to partner with Token2049 and Op3n to showcase some of the earliest and most renowned pioneers of this sector is truly an honor. The exhibition puts the spotlight on this inevitable revolution of the arts with a focus on a time-tested creative industry, rather than the flavor of the month.”
In addition, attendees will be able to see Op3n’s latest NFT drop “A3,” developed by YOON and VERBAL who are behind the iconic Tokyo-based fashion brand Ambush. The iconic phygital “A3” NFT will be uniquely presented in a glass display case on the exhibition floor. 
“Art, culture and technology are intersecting in exciting and completely new ways, with many industry-firsts taking place around the globe,” said Jaeson Ma, co-CEO and founder of Op3n, the world’s preeminent contemporary NFT experience brand. “From digital creators and traditional artists to fashion brands such as Ambush who have been expanding their presence in the NFT space, we’re bringing together an incredible pool of talent to celebrate and honor their work.”
Ma will also be speaking for a panel on the future of IP and communities in Web3 on Sept. 29 at 2:45 pm along with Verbal, who will speak more about “A3” in detail.
Token2049 Singapore’s agenda will be featuring a series of discussions touching on the latest developments in the Web3 ecosystem — from the global macro narrative for crypto, the rise of Web3 gaming, the emerging social and creator economy, the future of AI and generative art, present and future Web3 infrastructure and much more. 
As part of Asia Crypto Week, Token2049 attendees can expect to attend a full line-up of side events, conferences, networking events, workshops and parties taking place throughout the week. 
Visit the site for more information and continued updates on Token2049 Singapore. 
Token2049 is a premier Web3 event, organized annually in Singapore and London, where decision-makers in the global crypto ecosystem connect to exchange ideas, network and shape the industry. Token2049 is a global meeting place for entrepreneurs, institutions, industry insiders, investors and those with a strong interest in the crypto and blockchain industry.
Founded in 2021 as a subsidiary of EST Media Holdings, Op3n imagines a world where communities can come together to create, own and bring their ideas to the world. Op3n’s mission is to be a launchpad for ideas and communities to create meaningful experiences together. By consolidating the tools needed to mint, share and engage with NFTs and digital tokens into one vertical stack, Op3n leverages its cross-industry expertise from the entertainment, gaming and tech ecosystems to lay the foundations for a new era of community-driven, inclusive entertainment while bringing everyone together on a journey into Web3. 
Media Contact 
Melissa Esguerra

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Literary NFTs: Here's How Writers Can Leverage Their Passion in Web3 – nft now

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Every week we simplify the market into key points so you can stay up to date on market trends, upcoming drops, top project guides and much more!
BY Randy Ginsburg
September 28, 2022
In the last few years, platforms like Substack have upended the power dynamics of the legacy publishing industry, providing both established and emerging journalists with freedom, access, and uncapped earning power. Now, literary NFTs are adding fuel to this fiery paradigm shift, opening the door for unprecedented levels of collaboration, direct connection, and value creation between writers and their audiences. 
While traditional publishing will never disappear, the power imbalance between creators and publishers will. This article will guide you through the basics of literary NFTs, including the potential benefits and downsides, use cases, pricing, community building, and copyright.
First, let’s start with a definition. 
What is a Literary NFT?
A literary NFT is a digital literary work (a book, poem, or article) minted directly to the blockchain as a non-fungible token. The beauty of literary NFTs lies in their versatility. NFTs can showcase a written work, act as a digital collectible, or serve as a key to an exclusive fan community. Some creators may even release individual NFTs of fictional literary characters.
While still in its infancy, plenty of literary NFT projects have popped up in the last year from independent and well-established creators. EtherPoems released one of the first collections of on-chain poetry, and TheVerseVerse regularly mints the work of crypto-native poets like Sasha Stiles and Ana Maria Caballero. Neil Strauss minted the first major decentralized book, providing one random reader with the copyright. Kalen Iwamoto is pioneering the intersection between crypto-native writing and art. Creatokia is bringing it all together by building a new world and marketplace for publishers, authors, creators, and collections.
While the benefits are already visible as Web3 adoption increases, literary NFTs are positioned to become an integral part of any writer’s marketing, crowdfunding, and community-building strategies.
The benefits of NFTs for Writers
Like the art and fashion industries, the legacy publishing industry is controlled by power-hungry centralized middlemen. In exchange for providing upstart funding and distribution channels, traditional publishers have complete control over the value chain. NFTs upend this system, bypassing the publishers altogether and providing writers with more creative freedom, flexibility, and earning power than ever before. 
So follow along.
Creative Control and Fan Connection:
Writers, like all creatives, long for the freedom and uncensored ability to express their ideas as they see fit. But in many writer-publisher relationships, the publisher often has a strong hand, or even the final say, in creative input. By publishing directly to their audience, writers can avoid these creative gatekeepers and retain full creative control of their work. 
Going direct to the audience also provides creators with a layer of utility, access, and authentic fan connection, unlike anything we’ve seen before. Ultimately, it’s up to the creators what type of perks they want to provide their NFT holders. Some NFTs can grant owners personal access to the creator, while others can serve as a ticket to an exclusive fan community or exclusive book signings. 
Some creators even give their audience a say in the direction of the work through the use of on and off-chain voting proposals. This has further opened up a market for community-generative content where NFT holders can dictate the creative direction of the work and sometimes even add directly to the work themselves. A thriving example is The Writer’s Room from Jenkins the Valet and Tally Labs, which have partnered with Neil Strauss, a 10-time best-selling author and first mover in literary NFTs, to create the first community-generative book that will be sold to the public as its own NFT.
The opportunity for community-wide creative voting rights has built one of the most loyal, passionate, and tight-knit communities in the NFT space. With only 80 of the total minted 6,942 Writer’s Room NFTs listed for sale, it’s evident that the community wholeheartedly believes in the project and is determined to make it succeed. 
Unlockable Content: 
A major aspect of NFTs is the ability for creators to add unlockable content. This is specifically relevant for literary NFTs as now, instead of minting a block of plain text, creators have the freedom and flexibility to experiment with using different media forms such as photos, videos, and GIFs for the actual NFT while including the written work as downloadable content in the form of a PDF, .epub, or text file. 
It’s good to note that the downloadable content doesn’t need to be text. It can be anything, like an exclusive audio file, a link to an owner’s only live reading, or a collection of work-in-progress titles that didn’t make the cut
Royalty Structures: 
When it comes to earning power, writers have historically gotten the short end of the stick. Due to the vastly misaligned financial incentives of the traditional publishing industry, professional writers are often subject to low salaries and razor-thin royalty percentages, while the publishers and distributors capture the majority of the value. NFTs flip the value chain on its head, allowing creators to earn immediately, directly, and in some situations, consistently. 
With smart contracts, writers can earn a cut every time their work is resold. With used book sales accounting for a sizable percentage of the overall book market, the ability to collect royalties on secondary sales unlocks new value chains writers have never seen before.
However, it’s important to note that there are very few writers currently making a full-time living off of literary NFTs. Perhaps it could be done, but the nascent nature of literary NFTs is worth consideration as you approach your broader writing and marketing strategy.
Drawbacks of NFTs and things to consider
As you spend more time in the NFT space, you’ll often hear something like “we’re so early.” While that’s true for all of crypto, it’s a significant downside for literary NFTs. 
Most people still don’t know what NFTs are, and even fewer actually own any. Literary NFTs are a blip in the overall market, mainly driven by art and digital collectibles. This limits optionality for both creators and consumers. There are no well-known literary NFT-specific marketplaces and very few “household names” in the literary NFT space. While this is an upside to creators (less competition and first-mover advantage), it’s also a major drawback (fewer sales). A small market for primary sales means even less frequent secondary sales, ultimately removing a key financial driver for creators.
For greater adoption, readability needs to be frictionless and in-platform. Outside of the LIT Project, which is readable in OpenSea, there are no in-marketplace or standalone NFT content readers, nor is there integration with existing e-readers like Kindles or iPads. This is also part of the reason many authors opt to include their actual work as unlockable, downloadable content and have the NFT be another form of media like an image or GIF. 
Which blockchains you should mint on: the pros and cons
Most creators choose to mint on either the Ethereum or Polygon blockchains. Each has its own selling points around network size, creator spending preferences, consumer spending preferences, security, and community input which we cover in-depth in our guide to minting fashion NFTs. To maximize reach and market size, we recommend starting off on Ethereum as it’s the largest, most secure network. It’s also the entry point for those first getting into the NFT space. But if you want to distribute your work widely, Polygon will likely be much cheaper for both you and the end-user.
How to mint an NFT: platforms and fee structures 
Given the size of the literary NFT market, most creators choose to list their work on at least one of the many general NFT marketplaces like OpenSea, Foundation, or Rarible. Each of these marketplaces has built up sizable user bases through multi-sided network effects and provides creators with the highest likelihood of a sale. We cover all you need to know about platform size, minting fees, royalty structures, and copyright authority in-depth in our Top 10 NFT Marketplaces article, so we will spend most of our time here focusing on literary-specific platforms. Regardless of the platform, you’ll need a wallet (we recommend Metamask) and a little bit of ETH to get started.
Mirror: Mirror is by far the most robust offering for independent writers to publish their work to the blockchain, crowdfund projects, and build communities. 
On Mirror, all written work is published as an entry, which is essentially a basic blog post. From there, writers can choose to mint their entries as NFT editions, setting their desired price and quantity.
Mirror also offers users the ability to mint a limited supply of entries at fixed pricing tiers, giving them full control over the size and the price. This is a great way to represent tiered rewards or community memberships as an addition to your literary NFT. For example, you could release a total of 351 NFTs across various tiers. 
Although the writing of each entry is the same, owners of each tier will receive different levels of access and utility predetermined by the creator. The first edition commands more value, since it’s treated as the first edition of any literary work. 
As of writing, Mirror doesn’t offer unlockable content, so many people use Mirror to mint their writing, instead of another image or video file type (although that option is available too).
Like OpenSea, Mirror uses a process called “lazy minting,” meaning that your work isn’t minted on the blockchain until someone purchases it. This allows for a free listing, limiting any upfront financial risk if your work wasn’t to sell. On the flip side, since your work doesn’t actually live on the blockchain until post-primary purchase, it can not be listed for purchase on any other NFT marketplace until after the first sale. To compensate for this, Mirror offers the ability to embed NFTs into any website. This allows for a unique distribution mechanism that most other NFT platforms do not offer and is a great way to maximize reach. 
What really makes Mirror unique is its crowdfunding tool. Think of it like a Web3 GoFundMe. In just a few clicks, anyone can raise funds for an idea or project. In exchange for providing ETH to fund an idea, backers receive a project-specific token, and in some cases backer-specific NFTs, as a reward. This token serves as a “proof of patronage” and can even represent a financial stake in the future success of the idea. Like other NFTs on Mirror, crowdfund blocks can be embedded directly into entries, so that writers can provide a complete picture of their vision, mission, and goals.
This is an excellent way for writers to finance ideas, build upfront community buy-in, and share their stories with the world. 
Royalty Structure: Mirror does not currently enable creators to set secondary royalty percentages, since most entries are rarely resold. 
Notable Mentions:
As the space continues to mature, a rise in literary NFT-specific marketplaces, platforms, and protocols is likely. To succeed, these platforms need to establish multi-sided network effects. Lit Ether, Sonn3t, and zang.gallery are all exciting projects to keep an eye on and experiment with, although they are still too early to amass a large user base. 
Bottom Line:  While Mirror has positioned itself as the go-to platform to publish, mint, and crowdfund literary works, it does not have its own marketplace, drastically limiting creator reach and secondary earning power. Outside of entries and crowdfunding (where Mirror excels), when first getting started, many independent creators like Brian Ondrako recommend listing on OpenSea or another major marketplace to ensure the highest likelihood of a sale.
As a self-published author, Ondrako sought a means to spread the word about his new children’s book, according to an interview with nft now. The intriguing nature of the NFT space convinced him to turn his 16-page spreads into NFTs “as a way for true believers to support the project,” he added. “Listing on OpenSea saved me a lot of money upfront since I had no idea of how successful it would be.”
How to sell an NFT: pricing and royalties
Pricing is tough with all NFTs, but it’s especially challenging with literary works. Understandably, pricing is a subjective and personal decision based on a variety of factors like quality, scarcity, utility, and hype. Here are a few questions to consider when starting off with your first project:
What type of NFT are you releasing, and how many? 
A great way to command value is to create scarcity and exclusivity. Are you mass distributing a book with unlimited copies? Or are you launching a 1/1 NFT of an early book cover sketch, with an unlockable download link to the PDF of your book, and the right to a physical copy? Consumers will likely treat the single book NFT as any normal physical book, while they may view your early cover art as a unique collectible. The latter will always be more valuable. 
What can the owner do with them? 
As mentioned earlier, many creators use NFTs as access tokens, granting owners exclusive opportunities like meet and greets, behind-the-scenes content, or access to owner-exclusive merchandise. The higher level of access and opportunity that you provide to your owners, the higher price you may be able to command.
How good is your work? 
Let’s face it. While all projects are commendable, some are better than others. However, high quality is often dictated by the market, which defines the financial performance of the work, and thus the right to a higher price tag. 
How large is your existing audience? 
It’s often easier to charge more when you have an existing audience that is already supportive and familiar with your work. When first starting out, we’d recommend pricing on the lower side and letting your work speak for itself. As you continue to build up a community and drum up some hype around your projects, you’ll likely have the ability to charge more for your work. 
How to build a community for your NFT collection
In the NFT world, the community is king. The same goes for writing. Consequently, your audience should always remain the main focus when publishing any sort of written work, especially when launching a literary NFT project. You have to ask who the content is for. Have a clear purpose for your work in mind, and know it makes your reader feel. Crucially, the same considerations apply when building your community, and the best way to build one is to rally people around a goal or mission larger than themselves.
“If your community is built on hype, they’ll leave when that hype isn’t sustained,” said Tally Labs Co-Founder SAFA in an interview with nft now. “We spend time getting to know our members, we’re in Discord frequently, and we’re building a really solid community with a shared vision. As a Founder, being open and transparent with your community is crucial.”
Building a quality community can be achieved through emotional connection, virtual and IRL interaction, co-creation, or a combination of the three. Creating a tight-knit community helps to strengthen personal bonds, becomes a key differentiator of your project, and results in further success of the project and aligned financial incentives for all.
Creative commons and copyright in NFTs
There is an ongoing debate around the “right” way to approach copyright and IP protection in the NFT space. In the literary world, where IP around storytelling and character creation is so important, this discussion is even further amplified. The most liberal form of copyright is Creative Commons Zero (CC0), wherein creators must waive any copyright protection and agree to have their work live completely free in the public domain for use, reuse, or adaptation. From there follow various levels of non-CC0 protection related to commercialization and licensing.
It’s crucial to consider where you want your project to stand, especially for community generative or derivative work. Some relevant questions to ask yourself:
Your answers will have massive implications across pricing, community buy-in, and overall success.
And this is where projects like The Writer’s Room — and NFTs in general — are particularly unique. Thanks to the commercial rights that BAYC grants owners, Jenkins has built an entire business and book around his ape. The project also allows ape holders to license their characters for use in the first Jenkin’s Novel, in exchange for a portion of the book’s proceeds. Tally Labs, who’s betting on the belief that the next generation of fictional household characters will live on the blockchain, plans to replicate this model across the top NFT collections as they venture into additional books, film, audio, and beyond.
“The most famous Web2 media business that most people think of is Disney,” explained SAFA to nft now. “Disney pretty much invented modern copyright law as we know it, and a large portion of their business is built on protecting their IP at all costs and owning everything. This works for them! When BAYC came around and offered commercial rights to holders, an entirely new mindset emerged. Rather than a central party being entrusted to build and own everything, individuals were given the tools to play their part and benefit both themselves and the wider brand.”
“We don’t think this trend is going anywhere anytime soon, and we’ve bet our business on it,” added SAFA. “We believe deeply in handing over amazing IPs to individuals, and harnessing their collective creativity. We will be there the whole time to help guide it and shape the vision, but if the community is driving, then the IP you create will always be reflective of what they want.”
Now that you have a general understanding of what literary NFTs are and how to use them as vehicles for direct distribution and value creation, it’s your turn to rewrite the narrative of Web3 publishing. Your imagination is truly the only limit, and we’re excited to see what you do with it.

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