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How To Buy NFTs: A Super-Easy Guide For Anyone – Bernard Marr

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Der Bestsellerautor und Geschäfts renommierter KI-Experte Bernard zeigt, wie sterben Technologie des maschinellen Lernens das von Unternehmen verändert. Das Buch bietet einen Überblick über einzelne Unternehmen, beschreibt das spezifische Problem und erklärt, wie KI die Lösung erleichtert. Jede Fallstudie bietet einen umfassenden Einblick, der einige technische Details wichtige Lernzusammenfassungen enthält.
Marrs Buch ist eine aufschlussreiche und informative Untersuchung der transformativen Kraft der Technologie in der Wirtschaft des 21. Jahrhunderts.
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Bernard Marr is a world-renowned futurist, influencer and thought leader in the fields of business and technology, with a passion for using technology for the good of humanity. He is a best-selling author of 20 books, writes a regular column for Forbes and advises and coaches many of the world’s best-known organisations. He has over 2 million social media followers, 1 million newsletter subscribers and was ranked by LinkedIn as one of the top 5 business influencers in the world and the No 1 influencer in the UK.
Bernard’s latest book is ‘Business Trends in Practice: The 25+ Trends That Are Redefining Organisations’
Bernard Marr ist ein weltbekannter Futurist, Influencer und Vordenker in den Bereichen Wirtschaft und Technologie mit einer Leidenschaft für den Einsatz von Technologie zum Wohle der Menschheit. Er ist Bestsellerautor von 20 Büchern, schreibt eine regelmäßige Kolumne für Forbes und berät und coacht viele der weltweit bekanntesten Organisationen. Er hat über 2 Millionen Social-Media-Follower, 1 Million Newsletter-Abonnenten und wurde von LinkedIn als einer der Top-5-Business-Influencer der Welt und von Xing als Top Mind 2021 ausgezeichnet.
Bernards neueste Bücher sind ‘Künstliche Intelligenz im Unternehmen: Innovative Anwendungen in 50 Erfolgreichen Unternehmen’
31 August 2022
There is a lot of hype around NFTs and the vast fortunes that are regularly being made – and lost – by investing in NFTs. NFTs – Non-fungible Tokens – are unique tokens that live on a blockchain and can be securely traded or used to prove ownership of connected assets. Like any unique asset, this means they have the potential to become collectable, desirable, and grow in value.
As with cryptocurrencies (think Bitcoin and Ethereum) that also live on blockchains, they are popular these days as speculative investments. Buyers purchase them hoping to profit from the increases in value, or dramatic swings in value, that can see them gaining millions of dollars in value overnight.
However, history has shown that it would certainly be very unwise to consider NFTs – or crypto in general – as any kind of “get rich quick” scheme! Just as they can increase rapidly in value, they can decrease just as quickly. In fact, one index shows that the most popular NFT artworks have dropped in value by around 70 per cent this year.
For people interested in technology, though – like myself – the potential value of NFTs goes far beyond their potential to make a quick buck. Many believe that “utility” NFTs will have all sorts of uses in the future. This includes being used to represent other assets such as rare whisky, tickets to events, to authenticate certifications, or as deeds of ownership to virtual real estate in the metaverse.
Anyone who likes the idea of getting involved, however – for whatever reason – will quickly find out that even getting hold of one can be a tricky process. Unfortunately, the process of finding, buying and storing NFTs is fraught with dangers that can trip up an unwary newcomer. From cryptocurrency, gas fees, wallets and decentralized marketplaces, there are many elements that need to be understood. So here’s my overview of the processes involved, from how to choose an NFT to how to ensure you keep it safely once you’ve got it.
Even if you aren’t planning on buying an NFT purely to get filthy rich (hint: you won’t!), there are many reasons for doing so. Perhaps the most common is that you like the idea behind the technology and want to get an idea of how it works. To get started, you will need a wallet. What confuses a lot of newcomers to the space is that the wallet isn’t actually used to store your NFTs. They are stored on the blockchain – a distributed database file that’s duplicated across many computers in the network, meaning no one person can alter it without permission. What the wallet actually stores is the private key to the part of the blockchain that stores your NFT, giving you the ability to access and transfer it to someone else.
The most popular wallets are free – making this just about the only part of the process that you won’t be expected to pay for! Some of the most popular ones are:
If you’re just setting out to learn about NFTs and not intending on putting anything hugely valuable in your wallet right away, it probably doesn’t make too much difference which one you choose. However, there are a few differences that more advanced users might like to take into account. For example, Metamask and Math wallet are open source, meaning the source code can be examined by anybody to make sure it isn’t hiding any unpleasant surprises. Coinbase Wallet, on the other hand, is not; however, users may receive peace of mind in knowing it is created and backed by one of the world’s biggest cryptocurrency exchanges.
Once you’ve chosen and installed a wallet, you will need to get hold of some cryptocurrency with which to purchase your NFT. This will involve creating an account on an exchange -for example, Coinbase or Binance, adding a payment method such as a bank account for transfers or a debit/credit card, and, generally, verifying your identity in order to comply with the exchange’s anti-money-laundering (AML) and know-your-customer (KYC) requirements. This will usually involve uploading a scan of your identification documents. As always, whichever service you choose to work with, be sure to carefully read their data protection policies to ensure you are happy with how they will use your data.
Although there are various cryptocurrencies that can be used to trade for NFTs, the most commonly used is Ethereum, and this is where most people will start. Once you’ve purchased cryptocurrency on your exchange of choice, you will need to transfer it you the wallet that you chose during the first part of the process. This is usually done by using the exchange’s “withdraw” facility and entering your wallet’s receiving address.
With your cryptocurrency loaded into your wallet, now comes the fun part – choosing and buying your first NFT! This means hitting up one of the many NFT marketplaces that are out there. These include:
As well as those general purpose NFT marketplaces where you will find a huge number of NFTs covering every subject, there are a growing number of specialist marketplaces focusing on particular types of NFT – for example, the NBA Topshots marketplace, for NFTs released by the National Basketball Association and the Axie Marketplace, specializing in NFTs related to the play-to-earn videogame Axie Infinity.
If you’re looking for NFTs from big names in the world of fashion, entertainment and celebrity, these tokens are often first issued through the brand’s own portals – such as those created by Nike, Gucci, McDonalds, for example – then turn up on the secondary marketplaces mentioned above when they are resold (usually at a far higher price!)
The process here is generally as simple as connecting your wallet to the marketplace (done with a simple click) and then transferring the amount of cryptocurrency that the seller is asking for. Within moments, the token should show up in your wallet, making you the proud owner of your first NFT!
Just to reiterate – the information I’m sharing here is primarily for those readers who are interested in the technology and would like to see how it works, first-hand, primarily as an educational exercise. I believe NFTs have the potential to revolutionize many fields of business and wider society, and learning about them now is a useful exercise for anyone who wants to be prepared for the digital future. I am certainly not endorsing them in any way as a worthy investment for those looking to make money. I also believe there are serious questions that need to be overcome around energy usage and environmental damage that could be caused by NFT and blockchain technology if it’s not used responsibly. Certainly, there has been a great deal of hype and excitement around the topic in the last few years, and inevitably much of this has been created by people looking to make money. However, as this begins to die down – thanks in no small part to those who have highlighted the dangers and challenges posed by the technology – I believe genuinely valuable use cases will emerge, and the true usefulness of NFTs will become apparent.
The term Web3 covers a number of trends that make up what is sometimes called the “decentralized internet.”[…]
Web3 technology is gaining traction — and in many ways, it is leading the charge of political and economic revolution.[…]
I have previously covered a number of projects in the space involving drinks makers partnering with technologists to create innovative use cases for decentralization.[…]
Throughout history, artists have often gotten a rough deal with corporations and middlemen profiting from their work long after they have received and spent the fees they were paid.[…]
The metaverse is a massive trend at the moment, with news and promises about the power of the metaverse splashed across social media and all the biggest media headlines.[…]
Technology is changing our world to such an extent that the majority of children in school today will do jobs that don’t yet exist.[…]

©Bernard Marr 2022
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Here's Why This Rare Bored Ape NFT Just Sold For $933,792 In ETH – Ethereum (ETH/USD) – Benzinga

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The Bored Ape Yacht Club (BAYC) is an exclusive community for holders of the ape and mutant themed NFT collections on Ethereum's blockchain. Commonly referred to as the Bored Apes, only 10,000 generative art pieces will ever be in existence.
What happened: Bored Ape #1268 just sold for 780.00 ETH ETH/USD ($933,792 USD). The value of Bored Apes is typically determined by the Ape's attributes, with the laser eyes, crown, and golden fur traits being the most coveted.
Here are a list of its attributes and how many others have the same trait:
Why it Matters: Bored Apes are the ultimate store of culture for NFT collectors. The NFT collection has gained huge influence in 2021, with an ever growing list of top tier celebrities making apes their profile pictures on Twitter. With the recent explosion in popularity surrounding the Metaverse, rare blockchain-based avatars are all the rage for those looking to flex online.
Being a member of the Bored Ape Yacht Club is not just about flexing online. Yuga Labs, the creators of the Bored Apes throw exclusive parties often with free private performances from members of the club such as Lil Baby. Other notable celebrities in the club include Post Malone, Stephen Curry, Dez Bryant, and Jimmy Kimmel.
Yuga Labs also created another NFT collection known as the Mutant Apes, which also provides membership to the elusive club. There are a total of 20,000 Mutant Apes, and the price floor is historically lower than the Bored Apes.

See Also: NFT Release Calendar and Best NFT Projects of 2021
Data provided by OpenSea.
Checkout the full Bored Ape Yacht Club collection
You can learn more about this NFT here.
This article was generated by Benzinga's automated content engine and reviewed by an editor.
© 2022 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.
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How to buy NFTs: Trojans' venture Moonlight aims to make it easier – USC News

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Blake Asherian realizes that most people don’t have a spare $60,000 just lying around — which is about what you’d need to buy an NFT (non-fungible token) of any real value. He also understands that at a broader level, most people don’t even know what an NFT is or how to buy one.
That’s why Asherian and three other Trojans — Gabriel Perez, Matthew Hausman and Can Toraman — have started Moonlight, a fractionalized NFT marketplace that allows users to buy, own and sell fractions of an NFT in a simple and user-friendly way.
Moonlight — Blake Asherian, CEO and founder; Matthew Hausman, frontend architect; Can Toraman, technical advisor; and Gabriel Perez, product and community (clockwise from top left) — allows users to buy, own and sell fractions of an NFT in a simple and user-friendly way. (Photos/Courtesy of Blake Asherian, Matthew Hausman, Can Toraman and Gabriel Perez)
Despite gaining significant traction within the last year, NFTs are still in their infancy, and there are financial risks involved given their uncertainty and high price tags. Moonlight hopes to remedy that, or at least help bridge the gap between most people and this emerging space.
“If the average personal income is 63K, and the average cost of a blue-chip NFT is 51K, that’s a big problem,” said Asherian, a business administration undergraduate in the USC Marshall School of Business.
“Part of the reason why people are not as prone to getting into NFTs is because there’s such a high barrier in terms of knowledge, and technology,” Asherian added. “We’re breaking down that barrier.”
The concept of Moonlight is simple: A group of people will choose an NFT they want to crowdfund, and once the funding goal is reached, each crowdfunder becomes a co-owner. From there, co-owners can buy and sell their fractions on Moonlight’s platform.
Though the platform might be simple — or at the least the goal is to make it as simple as possible for people — the concept of an NFT isn’t widely understood and can seem a little daunting.
Essentially, an NFT is a unique piece of digital art that is certified using blockchain, an immutable record of ownership. The non-fungible part means that no two items are alike or equal. NFTs function similarly to how people collect and sell art or trading cards. Some items are worth next to nothing, while others fetch millions of dollars.
Moonlight’s goal is for people to have the opportunity to own fractions of NFTs of real value, which is why the company focuses on “blue chip” — or most valuable — NFTs, like Bored Ape or CryptoPunks, which have the potential to provide long-term returns and can easily go for six figures.
But why would a digital image of an ape or a pixelated person be worth hundreds of thousands of dollars?
Well, why would someone pay over $7 million for a baseball card? Or thousands for any of the “contemporary art” listed on Sotheby’s?
All are fair questions, and the answers could vary depending on the person or item. The common factor is that collectors feel that these are assets that will increase in value. NFTs are just the newest version.
I would always argue with people: What is the difference between your trading card and an NFT? They took a picture of a guy and then put it on a piece of paper, and it has value somehow.
Matthew Hausman, Moonlight frontend architect
“I would always argue with people: What is the difference between your trading card and an NFT?” said Hausman, Moonlight frontend architect and 2021 USC Viterbi School of Engineering graduate.
“They took a picture of a guy and then put it on a piece of paper, and it has value somehow.”
For those who only read certain media accounts, it may seem like NFTs and the cryptocurrency used to buy them are a losing venture, and they might be for some. However, the creators of Moonlight were quick to point out that there are a lot of financial risks out there, and their platform’s crowdfunding feature can help eliminate some of those potential dangers.
With Moonlight, crowdfunding is key. Users select an NFT and then have a certain number of days to raise the funds. If the money is raised in time, the NFT is moved to the Moonlight platform where people can buy and sell shares. If the funds are not raised in time, then everyone who contributed gets their money back.
“No other protocol allows you to literally raise funds to buy cool stuff together,” Asherian said. “The secret sauce here is having a technology that can allow any number of people to put their money into something and as a group get anything they want.”
The next concept, fractionalization, is not necessarily new, but how Moonlight allows users to fractionalize is in direct response to a large issue within the NFT community. Right now, someone who owns an NFT can fractionalize it and sell those fractions at whatever price they see fit, regardless of the actual market value. People who are knowledgeable about and can afford a six-figure blue-chip NFT don’t have a need for fractionalization. So, the practice can take advantage of those who are new to the space — a problem that Moonlight wants to correct.
“For a bunch of people who are just entering the space of NFTs, how can they trust that that valuation is true?” Asherian said. “They don’t know enough about the protocols or the NFT collections. They’re kind of swayed in an untrue direction and it’s unfair to them.”
Asherian and his team at Moonlight emphasize that their platform is truly for everyone. NFTs — and even the cryptocurrency used to purchase them — might seem daunting for those who aren’t already in that world, but their hope is to take away some of that hesitance.
“At the end of the day, if you look at who’s into NFTs, it’s that 1%, right?” Asherian said. “We want to tap into the 99%, so we have to create a product that’s comprehensive for that group, which not too long ago included myself.”
The initial concept for Moonlight came to Asherian in late 2021, but his interest in NFTs started around two years ago when he was working for his cousin, Sean Rad, the founder and former CEO of the dating app Tinder. Rad — at one time at USC student — had invested in Genies, an avatar technology company, and Genies co-founder Akash Nigam started talking to Asherian about the company’s venture into NFTs. Though Asherian knew nothing about NFTs or blockchain, the concepts piqued his interest.
Soon after, he left his jobs to buy and sell NFTs full time. He admits that there were some definite growing pains early on because of the high barrier to entry, but those missteps put him in a position to succeed down the road.
He started drafting up the concept for Moonlight while studying abroad in Paris last year. He connected with fellow Trojans abroad which led to even more connections when he returned stateside. Asherian credits USC with introducing him to Perez, Hausman and Toraman, and making Moonlight what it is today.
Ever since I was a freshman, I’ve always heard that term ‘Trojan Family,’ but then I was really able to witness what it can do.
Blake Asherian, Moonlight CEO and founder
“I really believe in the Trojan Family and what it offers,” Asherian said. “Ever since I was a freshman, I’ve always heard that term ‘Trojan Family,’ but then I was really able to witness what it can do.”
A transfer student from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Perez said his interest in NFTs has been a gradual progression since he was in high school. He started by selling stocks with his friends, and then in college he found a new interest in cryptocurrency.
“I kind of fell in love with the philosophy behind Bitcoin, which is a very anti-centralization of money, anti-central banks, power-back-to-the-people sort of thing,” said Perez, a junior economics major in the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.
“Then I learned about Ethereum, which was the first time I realized this has a huge potential to be the currency of the internet in the future.”
Ultimately, Perez, product and community lead at Moonlight, felt that if he wanted to further his career in the crypto world, he’d have to move somewhere where he felt it was more popular and valued. He found just such an innovative environment at USC, where USC Viterbi even offers a blockchain minor.
He came to USC before the fall 2021 semester and joined Blockchain@USC — a student-run organization that engages with blockchain-related topics, develops blockchain applications, and connects with industry professionals — as the director of external relations.
We started talking about fractionalizing NFTs and the ability for smaller capital players to be able to dive into these collections, and I was hooked from there.
Gabriel Perez, Moonlight, product and community
At USC, both within his field of study and social groups, Perez surrounded himself with other like-minded people that shared his passion, which is when he first heard about NFTs and eventually met Asherian.
“We started talking about fractionalizing NFTs and the ability for smaller capital players to be able to dive into these collections, and I was hooked from there,” Perez said.
By the end of the spring 2022 semester, Perez and Asherian had formed the Moonlight team formed and started the work to launch their idea.
The Moonlight crew is aware of some of the sustainability concerns with NFTs, primarily the proof-of-work blockchain system that is used by most cryptocurrencies so that transactions can be processed peer-to-peer in a secure manner without the need for a third party. Proof-of-work consumes a significant amount of energy. Rooms full of computers are needed to run complex mathematical equations, and coolers are needed to make sure those computers don’t overheat. By one estimate, mining 1 Bitcoin consumes as much electricity as a standard American home would use in nine years.
Most NFTs are part of the Ethereum blockchain, which currently uses proof-of-work. However, next month the Ethereum “Merge” will shift its blockchain to proof-of-stake, which uses 99.95% less energy by reducing the amount of computational work needed to verify the blocks and transactions that keep the blockchain secure.
“Fingers crossed that ‘Merge’ goes well because it’s a very anticipated catalyst in the crypto world,” Perez said. “If it does go correctly, NFTs are probably not going to have much of an environmental footprint at all, compared to something like a few office buildings downtown.”
But before they get to the point of using more sustainable blockchain, Asherian said they must establish their footing. Moonlight is projected to go live later this fall, and Asherian said once they’ve developed their community and built trust, they can influence people to move towards more sustainable methods.
“When you’re a huge marketplace that everyone starts suspecting has authority within the NFT space, then you’re able to sort of tell them what to do next,” Asherian said. “We really want to be able to gain that authority, and the way to do so is by being transparent, simple and fun.”
Trust and NFTs — or crypto, for that matter — might not go hand-in-hand just yet for much of the general population, but that’s exactly what Moonlight is hoping to fix. They see NFTs as an opportunity not just for those “in the know,” but for everyone.
“We believe there is power in numbers,” Asherian said. “At the end of the day, we want to give power to the people so they can own anything they want, together.”
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Apple tightens its rules on crypto and NFTs in its App Store – CNBC

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